International Archaeology Day

Did you know tomorrow, October 18th, is International Archaeology Day? Neither did I, until I was doing some research for a Bedtime Math post last month. What does this have to do with The Risky Kids? Well, for one, archaeology is kind of a risky job, right? I mean, it is the profession of the one very adventurous chap by the name of Indiana Jones!

In reality, it was an experience we had while traveling in Spain that made me connect archaeology to The Risky Kids. We were nearing the end of our trip, and on the last day that Mike was with us before heading back to the States, my cousin took us to visit Italica.

Italica

Located near present-day Seville, Italica is the site of an ancient Roman city. The impressive ruins date back to 206 BC. Now, for you and I, this is crazy amazing. But for my kids, who had already traipsed through much of Spain and seen lots of “old stuff,” Italica was a hot, dusty, boring place. Especially when your parents passed multiple signs for a most amazing water park along the way.

As we tried to balance enjoying the sights ourselves without wanting to shake the children, we came across a group of graduate archaeology students participating in a dig. We stopped for a moment to observe, and to our surprise, a student came up to the kids and asked if they’d like to help.

My American self wanted to protest. Surely this went against some rule or regulation. Wasn’t there some kind of waiver I need to sign? And do you really want my kids messing with ancient Roman artifacts?

Italica

The answers were no and yes, and the next thing they knew the kids were learning how to sift through dirt samples and identify artifacts. Just in their little scoop of dirt they found tiles from mosaics, pottery shards, and playing pieces from a game kids their own age used to play on the roads thousands of years ago.

Italica

We thanked the students profusely for their time and continued on our way. And wouldn’t you know, for the rest of our visit to Italica the kids were totally engaged. They read the signs, observed the surroundings, and asked lots of questions. By saying “yes” instead of “no,” and by encouraging them to touch instead of telling them “hands off,” the experience became personal to them. It’s still one of the parts of the trip they talk about the most.

Italica

So thank you, future archaeologists, for taking the time to bring some “old stuff” to light for kids, and sparking an interest where previously there was none. Happy International Archaeology Day to you!

Of course, I realize we can’t all travel to archaeological digs and have this kind of experience (although our world-class Children’s Museum in Indianapolis offers a summer trip for families to dig for real dinosaur bones!). But have you ever visited a museum or historical sight that you thought did an excellent job of engaging your kids? We’d love to hear about your experience in the comments!

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